History of Printing/Publishing & Bibliography

Published Books (Monograph)

Negotiating Shakespeare’s Language in ‘Romeo and Juliet’: Approaches to Reading from Criticism, Editing and the Stage (Ashgate Publishers, 2009), pp. 242. With Peter Lichtenfels.

Romeo and Juliet, William Shakespeare. A new scholarly edition. (Peter Lichtenfels, co-editor). (Ashgate Publishers, 2009), pp. 693, and romeoandjulietedition.com.

The Letters of Dorothy Moore 1640-1660: The Friendships, Marriage and Intellectual Life of a Seventeenth-Century Woman ed, with introductory essay, pp.1-42 (Ashgate, 2004), pp. 214.

Literary Value and Cultural Power (Manchester University Press, 2001), pp. 216.

Outsider Notes: Feminist Approaches to Canadian Publishing, Writers and Readers, 1960-1990 (Vancouver: Talonbooks, 1996), pp. 312.
Nominated for Governor General’s Award; several reprints of chapters in books of criticism.

Co-authored Books

The Victorian Periodicals Hypertext (Oxford: CTI Centre for Texts, 1994), pp. 94. With Margaret Beetham et al.

The Bibliography of Nineteenth Century British Cookery Books and Related Domestic Manuals Published in Britain, 1800-1914,Vol. I (London: Prospect Books, 1987), pp. 438. With Dena Attar.

The Bibliography of Nineteenth Century Cookery Books and Related Domestic Manuals Published in Britain,1800-1914, Vol. II (London: Prospect Books, 1989), pp. 738. With Elizabeth Driver.

Edited Books

Reconstructing the Book: Literary Texts in Transmission, eds. L. Hunter with M. Bell et al. (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2001), pp. 231.

Performances

‘Can a Man be a Woman? Robert Kroetsch’s The Puppeteer’
1994: Universite de Strasbourg (France), Conference in Honour of Robert Kroetsch.
1995: University of Calgary (Canada), Calgary University Art Gallery; University of Western Ontario, London (Canada), Graduate Studies; University of Leeds (UK), Faculty Research.
1996:University of Toronto (Canada), Faculty Research; University of Huddersfield (UK), Graduate Studies.
1997: University of Leeds (UK), Theatre Workshop Graduate Studies.
2001: Warsaw University (Poland).

‘Trying not to be a Tragic Subject: Work by First Nations Writer Lee Maracle’
1995: Universite de Rennes II (France), Conference Autobiographie/Autobiography
1996: University of Nottingham (UK), Conference of the British Association for Canadian Studies (Literature).

‘Cooking the Books: Reading Canadian Women’s Writing’
1996: Oviedo Universidad (Spain), Conference of the European Association for Commonwealth Studies; Calgary University (Canada), Visiting Professor; Trent University, Temagami (Canada), The Idea of North Conference; University of Leeds (UK). Theatre Worshop Graduate Studies.
1997: Beilingries (Germany), Conference of the German Association for Canadian Studies.
2001: Warsaw University (Poland).

‘Bodies in Trouble’
1997: University of Leeds (UK), Conference Women and Texts/ Les Femmes et les Textes.

‘Face-Work: Coming to the End of the Line. A Study in the Poetry of Frank Davey.
1999: University of Leeds (UK), Revisions of Canadian Literature Conference.
2000: University of Leeds (UK), Theatre Workshop Graduate Studies.

‘The Face, the Mask and Classical Tragedy in the Household: The Rhetoric of Masking in Recent Work by Alice Munro.
2003: Université d’Orléans (France) Alice Munro: L’Écriture du Secret; University of Birmingham (UK) American and Canadian Studies special lecture.
2005: University of California Davis, Arts and Humanities faculty presentation.

‘Roget Falls in Love: How Analytical Thought Stops you Thinking (Crossing Margaret Atwood with bpNichol)’
2007: University of Birmingham (UK), Beyond the Book conference.

Essays

A History of the Book in Britain, (Cambridge University Press, 2002), pp. 514-32.

‘Why has Q4 Romeo and Juliet such an intelligent editor?’ in M. Bell et al., Reconstructing the Book: Literary Texts in Transmission, (Ashgate, 2001), pp. 9-21.

‘Household management and food texts, 1800-1900’, Cambridge Bibliography of English Literature, Volume 4, third edition, ed. J. Shattock, (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000), col. 2735-2754.

‘Food and Cookery Books, 1475-1700’, Oxford Companion to Food, ed. A. Davidson, (Oxford University Press, 1999), pp. 3.

‘George Orwell’s blood and marmalade: Nation state ideology in a print society’, in eds. S. Matthews and K. Williams, Re-Writing the Thirties: Modernism and After (Harlow: Addison, Wesley, Longman, 1997), pp. 202-216. Part 1 and Part 2.

‘Women and Domestic Medicine: Lady Experimenters, 1570-1620’, in eds. L. Hunter and S. Hutton, Women, Science and Medicine 1500-1700 (Stroud: Sutton Publishing, 1997), pp. 89-107.

‘Alternative Publishing in Canada’, in eds. L. Hunter, P. Easingwood, K. Gross, Difference and Community (Amsterdam: Rodopi, 1996), pp. 35-57.

‘Proliferating Publications’, fore. T. Jaine, in ed. C. A. Wilson, Luncheon, Nuncheon and Other Meals (Stroud: Alan Sutton, 1994), pp. 51-70.

‘Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century Trends in Food Preserving: Frugality, Nutrition or Luxury’, in ed. C. A. Wilson, Waste Not, Want Not: Food Preservation (Edinburgh University Press, 1991), pp. 134-158.

‘Printing in the Pennines’, in ed. C. A. Wilson, Provincial Foodpaths (Edinburgh University Press, 1991), pp. 1-37.

‘Writing, Literature and Ideology’, in eds. P. Easingwood, K. Gross and W. Kloos, Probing Canadian Culture, (AV-Verlag, 1991), pp. 52-64.

‘Illusion and Illustration in Cookery Books since 1940’, in ed. C. A. Wilson, The Appetite and the Eye (Edinburgh University Press, 1991), pp. 141-60.

‘Sweet Secrets: The Growth of a Genre’, in ed. C. A. Wilson, Banquetting Stuffe (Edinburgh University Press, 1986), pp. 36-59.

Articles

‘Adaptation and/or Revision in early quartos of Romeo and Juliet, Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America 100:1 New Series (Winter 2007), pp. 1-42.

‘The Dating of Q4 Romeo and Juliet Revisited’, The Library, 7th Ser, 2:3 (Sept 2001), pp. 281-5.

‘Introduction to Critiques of Knowing’, parallax, 5:2 (1999), pp. 121-127.

‘Tea Drinking in England: Ceremony, Scandal and Domestic Bliss’, New Comparison, 24, (Autumn 1997), pp. 108-157. Nominated for the Sophie Coe prize 1999.

‘Exploring the Cybertext: Literary Criticism and the Reader’, Convergence: The Journal of Research into New Media Technologies, 4:3 (Autumn 1998), pp. 100-102.

‘Ideology as the Ethos of the Nation State’, Rhetorica XIV:2 (Spring, 1996), pp. 197-229.

‘The Study of Modern Manuscripts’, review, Modern Languages Review, 90:1 (1995), pp. 169-70.

‘Bibliography of Jane Grigson’s Published Books’, L. Hunter, I. Holland, G. Stoneham, Petits Propos Culinaires, 38 (1991), pp. 1-21.

‘Textual Criticism Since Greg’, Modern Languages Review, 85:4 (1990), pp. 895-6.

‘Cookery Books and Provincial Printing in Northern England’, ed. G. Averley, Nineteenth-Century Short Title Catalogue Newsletter, 6 (July 1989), pp. 3-11.

‘Cookery Books: A Cabinet of Rare Devices and Conceits’, Petits Propos Culinaires, (May 1980), pp. 19-34.

Collaborations

Hartlib Papers Project, Sheffield University, (1987-1989).

The Nineteenth Century Project, Chadwyck Healey and the British Library, (1988-1999).

Victorian Periodicals Project, Manchester Metropolitan University, (1994-1996).

Related Experience

1980-1981: Established the press Delires, first publications being Clinical Notes by John Wilkinson and Comeuppance by Geoffrey Ward. Cover illustration by Canadian artist Adrian Emberley.

1981: Organised a poetry conference at Liverpool University featuring Eric Mottram, John Wilkinson and Barry MacSweeney.

1983: With the press Delires, published The Cenozoic Asylum by Christopher Dewdney, and co-published Berlin Return by John James.

1985: Published for the Institute of Bibliography, University of Leeds, Re-visions of Canadian Literature, ed. Dr. S. Chew.

1986: On editorial board of Nineteenth Century Project, Chadwyck-Healey and the British Library.

1986: On editorial board of the McGill Allegory Project.

1987: With the press Delires, co-published Proud Flesh by John Wilkinson.

1989: Contributed a section on computers and book history to a display organised at the Royal Society ‘The British Library: a temple and a warehouse of knowledge’.